rebellious rant about wills

Rebellious Rant about Wills

rebellious rant about wills

I’ve taken a hammering this week from people misplacing their anger about Wills and estates, and I’m sick of it. RANT ON:

I’ve just hung up the phone from an otherwise sweet lady, whose 100 year-old aunt had recently died without a Will.

I had to explain to her about the process of applying for Letters of Administration (differing from Probate), and which relatives have priority to do so, and how much the fees and expenses would be.

How Do I Find a Good Wills and Estates Lawyer

How Do I Find a Good Wills and Estates Lawyer?

How Do I Find a Good Wills and Estates Lawyer

Finding a good lawyer is no easy task. Even if you know a good lawyer, they might not specialise in the area of law you require.

Whatever type of legal issue you find yourself confronting, finding the right lawyer is crucial for the outcome of the matter.

The first step in finding a lawyer is determining what type of issue you have. The category of lawyer that you are seeking, specialises in ‘Wills & Estates’.

We need to talk about dying and death

we need to talk about dying and death

South Australia wants more people to talk about it.

Medical breakthroughs and public health improvements have greatly increased life expectancy.

Other medical and technical developments have enabled many people to remain active for longer, giving them a better quality of life, as well as a longer life.

The flipside of this is the ballooning cast of care, accomodation and medications for the over 70’s.

Do not store your original Will at the bank

Do not store your original Will at the bank

Do not store your original Will at the bank

Major bank’s belated discovery of stored Wills could trigger estate disputes

It has emerged that one of the largest and oldest banks in the world – Lloyds Bank – has discovered a cache of thousands of stored Wills in its ‘Safe Custody’ service.

The service was closed to new customers in 2011, but in 2019 the bank discovered that the approximately 190,000 papers still stored there included about 9,000 Wills. Some of the envelopes could not be matched to Lloyds’ customers.

weird probate Issues

Weird Probate Issues Part 9

weird probate Issues

Here’s one more in our series of articles about Wonky Wills, Pathetic Probates and Disagreeable Deaths.

If you’re twisted like us, you might get a laugh out of some of the strange stuff people do at the end of their days …
#1 Tomas Martinez
67-year-old Tomas Martinez was living on the street in Santa Cruz de le Sierra, Bolivia, when he was approached by police officers who had good news for him. His ex-wife (whom he abandoned years earlier) had died and was leaving him her fortune of $6 million.

Martinez thought the police were there to arrest him for his drug and alcohol related issues, and he fled without hearing what they had to say.

weird probate Issues

Weird Probate Issues Part 8

weird probate Issues

Here we go again, with more Wacky Wills, Poisonous Probates and Dreadful Deaths. If you’re twisted like us, you might get a smile out of some of the strange stuff people do at the end of their lives …

#1 Wellington Burt

US lumber tycoon Wellington Burt died in 1919. His Will directed that most of his fortune be put into a trust fund, which would only pay out 21 years after his last surviving grandchild passed away.

His immediate heirs, who had expected to receive his fortune, saw very little of it. When the trust vested in 2010, a fortune of around $110m (£67.5m) was shared amongst 12 beneficiaries, none of whom ever knew the man.

weird probate Issues

Weird Probate Issues Part 7

weird probate Issues

Here’s another in our series of articles about Weird Wills, Problematic Probates and Disturbing Deaths. If you’re twisted like us, you might get a chuckle out of some of the strange stuff people do at the end of their time on this mortal coil …

1. I say Hello and you say Goodbye
Anthony Scott, in his last will and testament wrote: ‘To my first wife Sue, whom I always promised to mention in my will. Hello Sue!’

2. Proper Conditions
The last will and testament of Edith S of Walsall included £50,000 to each of her children, Roger, Helen and Patricia. Their inheritance was not to be spent on ‘slow horses and fast women and only a very small amount on booze’.